Do I Need Training to Start an Orphanage?

This post is written by Dr. Ken Acha, provost of Austin Bible Institute, and founder of Shaping Destiny, a nonprofit orphan care and poverty alleviation organization. He shares his insight and heart about orphan care, formed by 10 years of personal experience.

Orphan Care TrainingWho needs training to start an orphanage? That’s a common feeling that people have. We felt like that when we started our orphanage in Africa. A good heart doesn’t equal to help for orphans. Believe us, we are speaking from experience. We have seen people hurt poor people (especially orphans) and themselves when they are working hard and doing what they think is best to help the poor.

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Orphan Care Bases

Orphan Care Bases

We often advise people who set out to start an orphanage not to focus on starting an orphanage. Instead, we advise them to focus on what the orphans’ needs are. Sometimes, it may mean starting an orphanage. At other times, it may mean starting orphan bases.

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Fight, Flight, Freeze Response to Stress & Conflict Resolution

Conflict is EVERYWHERE. And yet, many of us are never taught how to handle it and strive toward peacemaking and reconciliation. In this post, Dr. Ken Acha discusses different human responses to stress and conflict. Keep these in mind not only to evaluate yourself, but when caring for children who have already gone through enough stress in their lives. Teach them how to reflect on their own responses and choose better ones in the future.

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Our Level of Confidence in a Diagnosis Correlates Poorly with its Accuracy

In the Western world, the concept of confidence is highly stressed. Children are told to be confident in themselves…adults are taught that confidence is the key to opening doors whether in a career or a relationship. While confidence can be a great tool, it can also be great hindrance. In this post, Dr. Acha shares the importance of a little healthy self-doubt and how pausing to confirm your conclusion can help avoid a lot of pain.

In the patient-physician relationship, the physician, as the leader, is supposed to guide the team to victory.

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3 Ways You Can Love At-Risk Children More Effectively

This post is written by Amber Kelly and Danielle Chambers, two students at Austin Bible Institute. They both have a strong love and passion for orphans, strive to get proper training to equip themselves, and work regularly with Shaping Destiny, a nonprofit orphan care ministry.

We have had the opportunity in the past to attend the Empowered to Connect conference simulcast, hosted by Grace Covenant Church in Austin, TX. While many important topics were presented, we wanted to zone in on some of the points that stood out the most to us and helped us look at orphan care in an compelling way.

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Praise: The Catalyst of Great Thanksgiving

It’s that time of the year – time to be surrounded by loved ones and filled with peace, joy, and thanksgiving for all the blessings of the past year. But how do we find genuine thankfulness? In this post, Dr. Acha shares how praise is the catalyst for great thanksgiving. This concept can be applied to orphan care as well…as orphans are often plagued with depression and doubt for good things in their lives. Teach children to be quick to praise someone for good and see how thanksgiving springs up within them.

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Dont’ Kid With Your Demons

The Bible tells us to flee from temptation (2 Timothy 2:22) but that’s not always what people do. Sometimes, we think that because we have refrained a bit, or gone some time without giving in, that we are strong enough to always resist it. However, in this post, Dr. Ken Acha teaches us that we should never kid with our demons…we should avoid those temptations altogether. When it comes to orphan care, this is important to keep in mind when it comes to each child’s own unique situation. When you are trying to determine what a child can and can’t handle, knowing bit about their history, their past struggles, will come in handy. This is what some psychologists call differential susceptibility, a hypothesis that basically states that different people vary in the degree they are affected by experiences or the environment they are exposed to. Some people are more susceptible to certain influences than others––not only to negative but also to positive ones. Keep this in mind as you read this post.

“Here is a true story.
There was a woman who struggled with quitting smoking for a long time. Then she finally made it and quit smoking for a whole year. On the one-year anniversary of her quitting smoking, she decided to smoke just one stick of cigarette to celebrate. She hasn’t stopped smoking since. She now smokes more than she ever did before and doesn’t know how to quit again. It is harder for her to quit now than it was before. She just doesn’t know how to quit anymore.” Read More…

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